Posts Tagged ‘Chinese’

My Stay-cation, A Day As A Tourist In Singapore.

May 19, 2011

It was a great day this Tuesday.

My friend’s Korean colleagues were here to visit and we were their guides for a day (or at least we tried to be good ones :P).

We first brought them to Chinatown for some ‘dim-sum’ – Chinese dishes that are served in small portions, which can be very filling. Then we flagged down a cab to Orchard for some SHOPPING! The Koreans love Charles & Keith. 😉

After shopping, we headed to Marina Bay Sands’ Skypark, up above the world at the 56th floor. I loved the view here. It was also my first time up there. Thank God for a glorious sky with no rain.

We then walked to the Esplanade (worked up a huge appetite by this time) for some seafood at ‘No Signboard Seafood.’ Yummy food I tell you – although a tad expensive.

And you thought we had enough to eat? We headed to the basement of Raffles City for some Hong Kong dessert! Durian mua-ji (bouncy textured skin wrapped over durian) and Mango-sago with ice. Yums.

Goodbyes, back to the hotel, back to life. Hope to head to Korea soon to see Hye Yong and Sun Yong! Take care ladies.

Hope you enjoy the photos below; click on them for a close up view. 🙂

xoxo

Barley Drink Recipe.

February 22, 2008

My boyfriend was down with Tonsillitis the entire week and could not make it to work. I decided to boil him a barley drink, in hope of easing some of his pain. It was my first time preparing this drink, but I was pretty happy with how it turned out. For us Chinese, we believe that the barley drink has a cooling effect, which is generally good for sore throats and fever.

Barley Drink (Serves 6)

Ingredients
1 cup of uncooked barley
1 cup of preserved sugared winter melon (糖冬瓜)
2 tbsp rock sugar (also known as rock candy)
10 cups of water
3 strips of pandan leaves (tied into a knot to release the flavour)

Directions
1. Wash the barley and soak it for 5-10 minutes with some water if you prefer a less cloudy drink.
2. Mix the washed barley, pandan leaves and 10 cups of water into a medium-sized pot and bring to a boil.
3. After the barley has turned semi-soft (about 10 minutes later), add in the rock sugar and winter melon.
4. Boil for a further 10 minutes, cool and it is ready to drink.

It is sweet and even when I am not sick I love having this drink. 🙂

My first Chinese New Year reunion dinner.

February 5, 2008

During the Chinese New Year eve (or days leading up to the eve), family members get together for a reunion dinner celebration. This reunion dinner was a treat from my boyfriend’s family. The eight-course dinner was enjoyed at:

King Crab & Seafood 
Block 204, Serangoon Central
#01-104

This “coffee-shop” style eatery is well known for its crab beehoon. Here’s a photo example of the dish, unfortunately not from King Crab & Seafood. Our dinner set did not include this dish but I remember it as being really delicious.


(Image taken from Eat Like Us food blog)

The first dish, as per tradition, was Yu Sheng (鱼生). Family members would use their chopsticks to mix this raw fish salad while reciting wishes for the new year. To ensure that we are “blessed every year” ( Nian Nian You Yu 年年有魚, literally meaning there is fish or leftover every year), some of the fish salad would be left on the plate unfinished. This dish was yummy.

Here’s the second to fifth dish (clockwise).
Sharksfin soup, Fried bean-curd skin with ginkgo nuts and vegetables, Deep fried prawns & a Spicy Thai Seafood Salad.

The sixth to eighth dish include Fried Chicken with Lemon Sauce, Orh-Ni (a warm yam dessert) & Mandarin Oranges. There’s also a photo of some lanterns sighted along the way back home.


If anyone knows the significance of these dishes do share them with me, I’m curious to know. Tomorrow’s another reunion dinner session, on the actual eve of Chinese New Year. Updates on that soon.
Here’s wishing all my fellow Chinese friends a happy and prosperous New Year! 🙂