Posts Tagged ‘food’

My Stay-cation, A Day As A Tourist In Singapore.

May 19, 2011

It was a great day this Tuesday.

My friend’s Korean colleagues were here to visit and we were their guides for a day (or at least we tried to be good ones :P).

We first brought them to Chinatown for some ‘dim-sum’ – Chinese dishes that are served in small portions, which can be very filling. Then we flagged down a cab to Orchard for some SHOPPING! The Koreans love Charles & Keith. 😉

After shopping, we headed to Marina Bay Sands’ Skypark, up above the world at the 56th floor. I loved the view here. It was also my first time up there. Thank God for a glorious sky with no rain.

We then walked to the Esplanade (worked up a huge appetite by this time) for some seafood at ‘No Signboard Seafood.’ Yummy food I tell you – although a tad expensive.

And you thought we had enough to eat? We headed to the basement of Raffles City for some Hong Kong dessert! Durian mua-ji (bouncy textured skin wrapped over durian) and Mango-sago with ice. Yums.

Goodbyes, back to the hotel, back to life. Hope to head to Korea soon to see Hye Yong and Sun Yong! Take care ladies.

Hope you enjoy the photos below; click on them for a close up view. 🙂

xoxo

House at Dempsey Hill, Singapore.

October 23, 2009

Sometimes food tastes good simply because…of the company one’s with.

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Fish and chips, with a unique set of dips. Tomato (I think), vinegar and tartar sauce.

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Very unique tasting seafood pasta.

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Dessert. There’s always space for that.

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A great place to just let down your hair, chill and watch life go by. Oh and also if you’re into tai-tai watching, you’ll see some beautiful people there. Where at? House at Dempsey, Singapore.

But like I said, sometimes food tastes good because of who you’re with. And this meal tasted fabulous.

Don’t take my word for it, check out the place for yourself. Also, do visit the toilets, very nice and clean design. 😉

Home-Cooked Saturday Dinners.

October 22, 2009

Every Saturday’s spent with great food, great company with my family and well, the usual Taiwanese drama on TV. It’s what we call our Saturday culture.

Family time together should never be neglected. We come together coz of food? Or is food the reason we come together? I’d choose the latter.

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I love close up shots of my food. Makes me feel close enough to smell it. *sniffs*

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Sometimes The Simplest Hawker Food Works.

June 26, 2009

When you’ve got family with you, all you need is a good program playing on the tele, a merry heart and a series of random hawker fare. 

Such is bliss.

The Pink Tea Cup Restaurant.

September 21, 2008

One of my favourite dinners in New York City with eight lovely people. The Pink Tea Cup is the place to be for awesome fried chicken for the soul, all american food at a cosy corner tucked away from the busy city.

It had a romantic vibe to it. Soft music from the likes of Babyface, Mariah Carey, Whitney Housten, and our friendly waiter who sang darn well – what is there not to love about this place?

Here is Michelle and I before entering the restaurant, it wasn’t too cold a night that December in 2007 – perhaps three to four degrees celsius. But we were hungry.

The real sweet lil place has met with us.

All nice and warm inside – until people opened and closed the door that was near our table that allowed gushes of cold air in.

We ate a lot. I’ll allow the photos to speak for themselves.

Soup or salad for starters.
 

Chicken with a choice of two sides.
 

Delicious corn bread filled with buttery goodness.
 

And we all thought that this jello with whipped cream would end off our dinner, we were wrong.
 

Mister Vincent Ha then ordered a cream cake.
 

Xiaomin’s pancakes were amazing!

And then our pudding arrived. (burp) We were already so full but it was too delicious to ignore.

We then headed down to Cafe Wha to groove our extreme overdose of calories away.

My Bangkok Trip This April.

March 24, 2008

Although I am still a month away from the end of my current school term, all I can think about now is my Bangkok trip that is happening on the 24th of April.

The land of smiles, the Thai food in Bangkok, the shopping, the massages and pedicures! I am feeling very enthusiastic about it right now. 😀

Food that I am looking forward to eat/drink include:
1. Pad Thai
2. Thai beef noodles with innards and meatballs
3. Street orange juice (this is very unique, according to Brenda who is my half-Thai classmate)
4. Mango sticky rice
5. Tom Yum soup


Source: Wikipedia Tom Yum

Mmmmm…I am drooling right now. 😛

My Grandparents’ Nam Seng Noodles & Fried Rice Stall.

February 29, 2008

I am so proud of my grandma and late grandpa for many reasons. One of the reasons is their Nam Seng Noodles & Fried Rice food stall that has been around for almost 40 years. They cook and sell delicious Chinese Fried Rice, Wanton Mee, Venison (deer meat) Hor Fun, etc. See a photo of their food menu below.

Numerous locations

This is their most current address, as seen in the photo above. Their first stall location (which made them famous) was at a hawker centre which was formerly beside Singapore’s Stamford Road National Library. The gorgeous old library is now demolished, which is a huge waste!

My grandparents moved to 33 Pekin St, Far East Square Food Meseum after that. They then moved again to Market Street briefly, and now they are operating at 25 China Street, #01-01 Far East Square. It is along the same stretch as Ya Kun Kaya Toast, right at the other end (where Don Pie used to be). Don Pie is now opposite Nam Seng Noodles & Fried Rice.

Here are some photos I took when I visited my grandma at the stall with my friends last Wednesday afternoon.

A photo of my grandparents and the menu at the stall.

Delicious Venison Hor Fun, they no longer sell the beef version of this. My grandma made my three friends and I a huge plate, I mean really huge.

The best wanton ever, and I am not saying this because it is my grandma’s stall. Eat it to believe it. 🙂

My friends and I visited the stall because we happened to be in the area. We had lunch just a couple of hours ago before the visit, so we ordered only two dishes to share. However, we managed to finish up everything. I wish I had more room in my tummy for their Wanton Mee – the fresh Char Siu and homemade chilli in the dish is really tasty. 😛

Here are some interesting links. (Note: This blog post has the most updated address of Nam Seng Noodles & Fried Rice stall)
makansutra
– Channel 5’s “Our Makan Places: Lost and Found” once featured my grandparents’ stall
– List of Yummy Eating Places – Lost and Found (I cannot confirm that everything in this list is updated, this only serves as a guide)

Here is a summary of the stall’s details.
Nam Seng Noodles & Fried Rice
25 China Street, #01-01
Far East Square
Tel: (+65) 6438-5669

Opening Hours
Mondays to Fridays – 8am to 9pm (Last order at 8:15pm)
Saturdays – 8am to 6pm (Last order at 5:15pm)
Sundays & Public Holidays – Closed

Food Photography Tips, Part II.

February 25, 2008

Part II – The Composition of Food Photography

Now let’s look deeper into how we can compose better photographs of food.

Today I’ll be covering Cropping, Propping & the Two types of Camera Angles.

1. Cropping

There are basically no real rules in food. The shape of the food determines the placing of it, but that could be challenged as well. Author of the Food Photography Blog puts it in a very candid manner.

“Good composition is sort of like p0rn0graphy.  You know it when you see it.  We could discuss things like shapes, tangents, compositional flow, balance, and all kinds of other high-faluten words, but they wouldn’t mean much.  The trouble is that Art is so damn subjective.  One man’s garbage is another’s Rembrandt.”

So a photo of a banana muffin could be taken these two ways (below), and still look good both ways. It all depends on the story you want the photo to tell. Rules are there for us to break them. 😛

Source: Mad Baker


Source: My Recipes

2. Propping

This really sets the mood for the photograph. The colour, texture (I’ll be covering this in another post) and style of the entire photograph should complement each other. Everything should just come together with ease and it should allow the viewer of the photograph to ‘get it’. Keep it within two to three props per photograph. The Stand Up and Cook blog says this about propping.

“Good propping will appeal to the subconscious of the viewer without detracting from the food itself.  Sample props would include glasses, table decorations, interesting serving ware.  It’s best to use props sparingly.”

Check out the amount of work that goes into propping and taking this photograph.

3. Two Types of Camera Angles (To create a 3D effect)

It is best to avoid a 90 degree angle in photographs, it makes the food look flat and unattractive. I’m sure the first photo below looks much better than the second one (90 degrees).

Photos that are taken at a lower levels usually turn out better.

a. 10 degrees (Almost at eye level, you could see inside the food)

Source: Diva Gourmet

b. 45 degrees (There’re more components involved, for example a glass of wine in this photo)

I hope you’ve learned from this post! 🙂 Check out Part III tomorrow for more tips on food photography.

Food Photography Tips, Part I.

February 24, 2008

Part I – Types of Food Photography 

I attended a food photography lesson last Friday, organised by the Singapore Management University‘s Visual Arts Society (SMUSAIC). This society was formed by members with an interest in photography, digital imaging and cinematography.

With the permission of Kejie and Gabriel (the two student instructors), I am going to do a series of tips on food photography which I picked up from their class on my blog. Let’s all strive to capture the gorgeousness of food in our photography. 🙂

Today I’ll be covering the different types of food photography.

There are 3 types of food photography:
1. Packaging Photography
2. Naked Food Photography
3. Display Food Photography

1. Packaging Photography

This is one of the toughest types of photography. It is the responsibility of the photographer to create a 3-dimensional effect out of boxes, sachets of packets of chips, etc. One tip would be to tilt to packages at different angles before taking the photograph.

2. Naked Food Photography


Source: Gastrofotos

Naked food photography simply means food that is out of a package and is styled. There is usually only one or at most two components in this type of photography. This type of photography is great for beginners with compact cameras.

3. Display Food Photography


Source: dkimages

Display food photography simply means that the photograph showcases a range of components. It could be a set meal with drinks and dessert or perhaps different types of food that used a particular ingredient, etc.

The most important thing before you plan to photograph food is to settle on your objective. Ask yourself, what do you want your photo to portray and which type of photography would suit that objective the best?

My personal favourite is Naked Food Photography. I love taking close up shots so that my viewers can almost touch and smell the food. In my opinion, the ability to do that is what sets great photography apart from good photography.

Here’s a behind-the-scene video on food styling and the hard work that goes into food photography.

My photographer friend Amos Wong takes really awesome food photographs too, check him out here.